Street and Reserve Trees

Hume City Council currently manages over 155,000 trees in streets and reserves.

Prunning

Find out more:

Benefits of urban trees

Street and Reserve Tree Policy

Electric line clearance

Tree planting

Tree maintenance

Trees and solar panels

Pest and disease

Tree roots and stormwater pipes

Naturestrip Policy

Tree removal request for a new cross over (driveway)

Tree Protection Seminars

 

Benefits of urban trees

Trees have many benefits such as:

  • Providing Shade
  • Temperature reduction
  • Providing food and habitat for urban fauna
  • Reducing traffic noise
  • Reducing the flow of Storm Water
  • Providing neighbourhood character.


Street and Reserve Tree Policy

Council’s Street and Reserve Tree Policy 2004 is the main document used by the Parks department in the administration and management of the City’s trees. The policy and associated documents can be accessed below:

 
Electric line clearance

Hume City Council has developed an annual Electric Line Clearance Management Plan. In doing so, Council is working toward compliance with the Electricity Safety (Electric Line Clearance) Regulations 2015. 

Tree planting

Council plants approximately 5,000 street and park trees between May and September each year. Appropriate species are selected, determined by multiple factors such as the species planted in the rest of the street and species suitability to the site.

Council is responsible for the planting and maintenance of trees on Council nature strips throughout their entire life cycle and doesn’t allow residents to plant trees on Council land.

If you would like to request a tree to be planted, you can contact Council on 9205 2200.  

Tree maintenance

Council has a proactive inspection program, where each street tree is inspected every 4 years by a qualified arborist. If street trees are underneath powerlines, they are assessed by a qualified arborist every 12 months. These inspections record the health and structure of the tree and identifies if any pruning or removal works are required.

Council’s arborists also conduct reactive tree inspections within these cycles. If you would like to request a tree inspection of one of Council’s trees, you can contact Council on 9205 2200. Please note that Council does not remove nature strip trees unless they are structurally unsound, dead or in decline.

If a street tree is creating leaf or bark litter, you may be eligible for Council’s Home Care and Maintenance Service team's home maintenance program, which provides services such as gutter cleaning. You can check for eligibility for these services by contacting Council on 9205 2200.

Trees and solar panels

Before installing solar panels, please consider the impact of mature and established street trees. Further information can be found in the Solar Power and You Factsheet.

Pest and disease

Generally, trees recover from infestation without human intervention. Some of Council’s trees require proactive treatment for insects. For example, our elm trees require treatment for elm leaf beetle.

Sometimes, trees need to be protected from our native fauna, for example the leaves of mature red gum trees can be eaten by possums, and if the possums are not prevented from accessing the canopy, the tree may die.

Only heavily grazed trees have possum guards installed on the trunks, allowing possums to graze other trees in the surrounding open space. 

Myrtle Rust Fungus Detected in Victoria

Myrtle Rust Symptoms

The fungus Uredo rangelii (myrtle rust), poses a threat to Victoria's nursery, forestry and beekeeping industries, as well as to public parks and gardens and native forests. It can potentially attack all species of the Myrtaceae plant family.

Early identification of this rust is vital for effective management and Agriculture Victoria should be notified immediately of all plants suspected of being infected with myrtle rust.

To find out more about the symptoms of myrtle rust and how to report it, visit the Agriculture Victoria website.

Tree roots and stormwater pipes

Properly constructed and maintained pipes are designed to withstand normal tree root and traffic loadings.  Tree roots can enter a pipe in poor condition, through cracks in the pipe or joins. Once tree roots enter, then blockages can occur as the pipe is an excellent growing environment or the roots. The condition of the pipe can be determined by a licenced plumber, who can remove the roots and repair the pipe to prevent the roots from re-entering.

Council should be advised if roots of the Council tree are to be damaged or removed, other than those within the pipe. You will also need to apply for a ‘Consent to work within a Hume City council Road Reserve' permit. This can be obtained via the following link.  A Council arborist can assess and determine the best course of action in relation to root pruning if required.

It is the land owners responsibility to maintain the stormwater pipe from the kerb and channel adjacent to the road back to the connection within the land owners property. Therefore, any blockages or repairs necessary are the land owners responsibility. Please see the illustration outlining the Stormwater Drainage Maintenance Responsibilities.

Infographic_-_Stormwater_Managment_and_Responsibilities_of_Residents.jpg

Naturestrip Policy

Council has a Residential Naturestrip Policy which provides information on the construction of naturestrips and approved alternative treatments.

For further information, please read the Naturestrip Compliance Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s).

Tree removal request for a new cross over (driveway)

The installation of a new cross over (commonly known as a driveway) or extension of an existing cross over may impact the existing street tree. An application must be made for a  ‘Consent to work within a Hume City council Road Reserve' permit


Tree Protection Seminars

Tree protection seminars provide an opportunity to deliver information to Council officers and tree managers in the industry with best practice ways to protect tress in the urban environment.

A selection of presentations can be found below:

Environmental Planning and Indigenous Trees
Tree Protection in the City of Hume
Protection of trees on development sites
University of Melbourne - Trees as Assets
Soil volume requirements for urban trees

 


Updated : 2:27 PM, 27 July 2017

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