Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Hume City is located on the traditional lands of the Gunung-William-Balluk people of the Wurundjeri. They are the traditional owners of this land. At the time of the 2016 Census, there were approximately 1,456 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people residing in Hume, the fifth largest Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in metropolitan Melbourne (ABS 2016). The suburbs of Craigieburn and Sunbury have the largest Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities within Hume City.

Access and Support Officer 
Hume City Council employs an Access and Support Officer who is able to assist our community elders and families who have a member with a disability or illness to access aged care, home and community care or disability services. This can help people to remain living at home. The Access and Support Officer can provide information only or support you through the process to access services.

Contact the Access and Support Officer on 9205 2838.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific Social Support Group

Elders On The Move Social Support Group offers Commonwealth Home Support Programme eligible Elders living in the Community the opportunity to come together and have a yarn. The group offers a range of activities including; social, cultural, arts and craft, music, cooking, light exercise and outings. Transport is available to and from the group. 

Contact the Community Support Services on 9205 2639

Hume City Council Family Services

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Engagement Team assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and children from birth to school age to connect with the following support services. 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Parent Engagement Worker – Ricki-lee Mumbler

Supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families to engage and connect with:

  • Maternal and Child Health Services
  • Early Start Kinder
  • Early Education and Care Services
  • Aboriginal Parents as Teachers program
  • Boorais and Beyond facilitated playgroup.

 

Maternal and Child Health Nurse – Amanda Colgan

Our Maternal and Child Health Nurse delivers a flexible service for families focusing on key ages and stages appointments.

Aboriginal Parents as Teachers Worker – Janine Brown

Our Aboriginal Parent as Teacher facilitator will meet casually with the family playing and learning together, acknowledging parent’s strengths as their child’s first teacher.

For more information or inquiries about these services please phone 9205 2297 or 0429 707 964

Reconciliation Action Plan

Hume City Council's Reconciliation Action Plan 2018 - 2022 is the document that guides our actions and programs. This document acknowledges the journey towards reconciliation, demonstrates recognition and respect for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community and provides practical actions to assist with health, education and employment opportunities.

Download the Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2022

Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group

Council is in the process of establishing a Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group. This group will act as an advisory body to Hume City Council. Its purpose is to inform us of the key issues, concerns and priorities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members. The group will also provide advice, input and feedback on policies, plans and services that aim to support participation in services and programs relevant to the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

Expressions of interest have been received and assessed and Council will soon make announcements regarding the members of the group. The Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group will meet every 2 months with the first meeting to occur in June 2019. 


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Events and Dates

Hume City Council recognises key events to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and improve understanding and awareness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples needs and strengths. We host Aboriginal key events such NAIDOC Week and Reconciliation Week.  

13 February: National Apology to the Stolen Generation Anniversary

On 13 February 2008, a historical national apology was delivered by the Australian Parliament to Australia's Stolen Generations. Read Reconciliation Australia's fact sheet on The Apology

26 May: National Sorry Day

National Sorry Day is a significant day for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and particularly for Stolen Generations survivors. The idea of holding a ‘Sorry Day’ was first mentioned as one of the 54 recommendations of the Bringing them home report, which was tabled in Parliament on 26 May 1997. This report was the result of a two year National Inquiry into the forcible removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, communities and cultural identity.

27 May – 3rd June: National Reconciliation Week

National Reconciliation Week (NRW) is a time for all Australians to learn about our shared histories, cultures and achievements and to explore how each of us can join the national reconciliation effort. National Reconciliation Week commemorates two key events in Australia’s history, which provide strong symbols for reconciliation:

  • 27 May 1967 – the referendum that saw more than 90 per cent of Australians vote to give the Australian Government power to make laws for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and recognise them in the census.
  • 3 June 1992 – the Australian High Court delivered the Mabo decision, which recognised that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a special relationship with the land. This paved the way for land rights known as native title. Mabo Day is held 3 June to celebrate the life of Eddie Koiki Mabo.

 
For more information, visit reconciliation.org.au/national-reconciliation-week

Find out more about the events and celebrations taking place across Hume this year at www.hume.vic.gov.au/reconciliationweek

First week of July: NAIDOC Week

NAIDOC is a celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and an opportunity to recognise the contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in various fields. Its origins can be traced to the emergence of Aboriginal groups in the 1920s which sought to increase awareness in the wider community of the status and treatment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee. Activities take place across the nation during NAIDOC Week in the first full week of July. All Australians are encouraged to participate.

For more information visit naidoc.org.au


How do I respectfully acknowledge the Traditional Owners of Hume City? 

Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners

An Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners can be done by anyone and is a way of showing awareness of, and respect for, the Aboriginal Traditional Owners of the land on which a meeting or event is being held. 

For example, at Hume City Council the following words are used:  
"I would like to acknowledge that we are meeting on country for which the members and elders of the Gunung-Willam-Balluk community and their forebears have been custodians for many centuries. The Gunung-Willum-Balluk of the Wurundjeri are the Traditional Custodians of this land. I would like to pay respect to the existing family members of the Gunung-Willam-Balluk. I would also like to pay my respects to their Elders, past and present, and the Elders from other communities who may be here today.

 “I would like to acknowledge that we are meeting on Gunung-Willam-Balluk land. The Gunung-Willam-Balluk of the Wurundjeri are the first and original people of this land. I would like to pay my respects to their Elders, past and present, and the Elders from other communities who may be here today.”

Welcome to Country

Protocols for formally welcoming guests to Country (Tanderrum) have been a part of Aboriginal culture for thousands of years. A Welcome to Country is a way of recognising and paying respect to Aboriginal people and acknowledging their ongoing connection to Country. A Welcome to Country ceremony is performed by Aboriginal Traditional Owners for people visiting their Country. These ceremonies vary from speeches of welcome to traditional dance and smoking ceremonies and are typically conducted by a community elder or known representative of that Traditional Owner group. A Welcome to Country usually occurs at the opening of an event.

A Welcome to Country can be arranged through the Wurundjeri Council. A Wurundjeri booking form can be downloaded from the following link. Bookings should be made well in advance of the event date at wurundjeri.com.au/request-council-traditional-ceremony


Updated : 1:18 PM, 31 May 2019

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